For Guys

31% of purchased children are boys and overwhelmingly 90% of child sex trafficking offenders are men.

The sexual exploitation of children and child sex trafficking is our issue because boys are being bought and men, largely, make up the demand for the sexual exploitation of children.

Let’s break it down.

The sexual exploitation of children and child sex trafficking is our issue because boys are being bought and men, largely, make up the demand for the sexual exploitation of children.

It’s taboo to think that boys are being exploited for sex, but they are. Some reasons boys don’t come forward to speak their truths:

“Boys can’t even be sex trafficked”: Assumptions like this are dangerous because it implies that boys can’t be victims.  This keeps them out of the conversation and limits the amount of resources they can access.

“Boys shouldn’t show their emotions”: This promotes the idea that boys who show certain emotions are “soft” or “weak,” because these signs of emotions symbolize a lack masculinity.

“You’re a guy, you should like it”: In many societies, males are pushed to be sexually active and to show off their sexual history, but this is not the case for all males. It doesn’t matter if the victim is male or female, if the victim is under 18, it’s wrong. Period.

So, how can we help boys heal?

Never assume you know someone’s story. Give them the chance to speak openly about their experiences and validate them.  Point them to resources where they can get help.

Guys are sexual exploiters, too.

Obviously not all guys purchase children or traffic them, but for the people who do, the majority are men.  These are men who choose to sexually exploit children. They use their physical strength, blackmail and/or manipulation to control their victim(s).

It’s taboo to think that boys are being exploited for sex, but they are. Some reasons boys don’t come forward to speak their truths:

“Boys can’t even be sex trafficked”: Assumptions like this are dangerous because it implies that boys can’t be victims.  This keeps them out of the conversation and limits the amount of resources they can access.

“Boys shouldn’t show their emotions”: This promotes the idea that boys who show certain emotions are “soft” or “weak,” because these signs of emotions symbolize a lack masculinity.

“You’re a guy, you should like it”: In many societies, males are pushed to be sexually active and to show off their sexual history, but this is not the case for all males. It doesn’t matter if the victim is male or female, if the victim is under 18, it’s wrong. Period.

So, how can we help boys heal?

Never assume you know someone’s story. Give them the chance to speak openly about their experiences and validate them.  Point them to resources where they can get help.

Guys are sexual exploiters, too.

Obviously not all guys purchase children or traffick them, but for the people who do, the majority are men.  These are men who choose to sexually exploit children. They use their physical strength, blackmail and/or manipulation to control their victim(s).

Call out & call in

If you’re with a group of your guy friends or with your family and you notice someone is making degrading comments and/or actions towards a girl or a guy in your class or community, it’s time you call them out. Let them know that you won’t stand for “locker room behaviour” and then call them in. Let them know that they too have a responsibility to ensure that all people are treated with respect and dignity, and let them know they can help.

Raise awareness

Be a trendsetter.  Take a stand and pledge to raise awareness with OneChild among your family, friends, school, and community.

Fundraise

Raising funds helps support vulnerable children and survivors of sexual exploitation with rehabilitation and reintegration, so they can rebuild their lives. Learn about our Survivor Care work and check out our fundraising toolkit for tips and ideas.

Volunteer

Join our network of volunteers and use your passions and talent to help stamp out the sexual exploitation of children and child sex trafficking.

 

Call out & call in

If you’re with a group of your guy friends or with your family and you notice someone is making degrading comments and/or actions towards a girl or a guy in your class or community, it’s time you call them out. Let them know that you won’t stand for “locker room behaviour” and then call them in. Let them know that they too have a responsibility to ensure that all people are treated with respect and dignity, and let them know they can help.

Raise awareness

Be a trendsetter. Take a stand and pledge to raise awareness with OneChild among your family, friends, school, and community.

Fundraise

Raising funds helps support vulnerable children and survivors of sexual exploitation with rehabilitation and reintegration, so they can rebuild their lives. Learn about our Survivor Care work and check out our fundraising toolkit for tips and ideas.

Volunteer

Join our network of volunteers and use your passions and talent to help stamp out the sexual exploitation of children and child sex trafficking.

 

Contact Us

8865 Woodbine Avenue
Unit D3, Suite 124,
Markham, ON
L3R 5G1
Canada

OneChild Network & Support Inc. is a registered Canadian charity: No. 831160544RR0001

General Inquiries: info@onechild.ca
Youth Inquiries: youth@onechild.ca

1.905.886.2222

General Inquiries: info@onechild.ca
Youth Inquiries: youth@onechild.ca

1.905.886.2222